Monday, 2 June 2014

Sir Pentacles, you've changed!

Chrysalis Tarot, Brooks & Sierra 2014
I've drawn a court card from Chrysalis Tarot today, 'The Illusionist' or Knight of Stones (aka Knight of Pentacles). I must admit, I find the court cards puzzling. They are conceived as a medieval 'troupe' of players which is a fun concept. It's just that I find that although the LWB claims that they correspond to traditional tarot courts, I don't find that to be the case, and particularly true of this card, Knight of Stones.

Now the Knight of Pentacles is a favourite of mine. I have blogged about him quite a bit. As I've said before, in my tarot world, the Knight of Pentacles is the firm, stable, slow-going, patient, hardworking, gentle-spirited, self-effacing one in the tarot courts. In the RWS image he is sitting firmly on his big, sturdy horse, well-rooted to the fertile earth, the sky awash with the glow of the life-giving sun, and bunches of lush greenery decorating himself and his horse's harness. He is well-grounded. 

I remember at the UK Tarot Conference a few years back, Rachel Pollack talked a bit about the Knight of Pentacles, how he is the responsible, sensible one who stands guard over his community, the person who is willing to take on the jobs no one else wants to do, the quiet one who understands the meaning of duty, takes his own time in making a decision or taking action. He's just a solid, nice guy. 

Then I draw Knight of Stones in Chrysalis Tarot and see a magician, and the LWB tells me he is 'spontaneous, confusing, a mystic' and that if I'm 'up for risky, raw adventure, follow his lead without reservation'. Who the heck is this guy? Because he's not the Knight of Pentacles. The LWB says the Illusionist's motto is 'nothing ventured, nothing gained'. The Knight of Pentacles I know would rather say, 'Slow and steady wins the race.' He is not a 'trickster', he is not 'filled with youthful exuberance'. I have no idea what's going on with this card. If the LWB said, 'we've created all new courts for you,' fair enough, but it says 'Our Troupe corresponds to traditional court cards'. Maybe that's just in name only, because I have looked at all the court cards and there are some stark anomalies. 

So which do I do, do I read according to the meaning conveyed by the LWB and the image of a magician, or do I read on my own understanding of the Knight of Pentacles? This is a decision you have to make when you get a deck that deviates from your normal tarot associations. Quite often I have ignored changes that don't work for me and just read cards according to the usual meanings I associate with cards (like with Tarot of Silicon Dawn, which finally drove me so bonkers I sold it. I mean, Pentacles as FIRE? I ask you!) Other times, such as with the Haindl, I cut the titles off and forgot about traditional court meanings entirely and just read according to what was on the card. So I don't know. As a single daily draw, I'm not sure what to make of this card. No doubt in a reading, it would become quickly apparent which way to go with the interpretation. 

For today I'll just go with what the book says (and chunter to myself about how it's not really the Knight of Pentacles). Well, I will admit that I agree with the LWB when it says the Illusionist is 'confusing.' CLEARLY I am not in the mood for 'risky raw adventure,' as just being confronted with this unexpected card meaning has made me a grumpy old cow. Apparently the appearance of the Illusionist is to spur me to action 'without a lot of confusing forethought' -- well I thought that was the sort of thing that helped you cross the street without getting run over, but never mind. This guy just sounds more like the Knight of Wands to me and I can't get past that. 

I'm going to go fume in the corner for a bit. See you tomorrow! 

8 comments:

  1. When I first started reading about this Knight of Stones I wondered... have they confused pentacles with wands? How do the ther meanings stack up, cos as you say, that ain't no Knight of Pentacles... I always see the knight of wands as playing and winning Quidditch while the Knight of Pents sticks to the egg and spoon race :)

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  2. It is almost like he has jumped into the card to transform our beloved knight into a pigeon
    I would be quite irritated by this and making a decision how to read them is the only thing you can do I guess :D

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    1. Hey! I quoted that today myself on Tarot Geeks, immediately after I posted this!!!

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  4. I have been reading tarot for twenty years - and I too would have to say that this specific card will be one that troubles me. (I am waiting for my deck to see them all.) And how interesting, indeed that it appears to represent an illusion in its self. It makes me want to burst out and start singing, "objects in the rear view mirror, they appear closer than they are." LOL! As Carla states, if the LWB didn't say that it was like the original RWS card, then it would certainly be looked at as a new character to get to know. Knowing this, I shall treat him as such. I have seen some decks, held them and tried using them only to turn around and sell them shortly after. But this one has enough love sprinkled in the artwork to keep nicely in my collection. xBridgett

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    1. I'm with you, Bridgett. I certainly don't mind new characters, it's just weird when they are packaged as old characters.

      Like you, Carla, this Knight of Stones doesn't fit any of my notions of what that title implies, though he seems a lovely character in and of himself.

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    2. Bridgett and Chloe, I can't deal with him! (No wait, I'm learning about this sort of thinking in CBT. What should I say instead...'I strongly prefer a traditional Knight of Pentacles but they don't all have to be. I can stand it if things are not traditional, even though I don't like it.' :D

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    3. LOL! Very enlightened of you :D

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